Smart lightbulbs could be exporting your personal data to China

first_img 5 Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: 3:16 7 ways smart home devices can help you sleep better Tags Comments Smart lightbulb at CES 2019. David Becker / Getty Images Today, you can operate almost everything in your house from your phone. But, like most technology, nothing is perfect. While smart lightbulbs themselves aren’t dangerous, the apps and platforms that control them might be. Last month, Dark Cubed, an American cybersecurity company, released its State of IoT Security report and detailed potential security threats in smart home devices. Dark Cubed said it purchased several in-home smart devices that can be found at Walmart, Amazon, Best Buy or other stores and tested their security. While the company said that it wasn’t surprising that most of the apps weren’t secure, the IoT (Internet of Things) lightbulbs were even worse. According to Dark Cubed, simply dimming your smart lightbulb could be enabling real-time location sharing. “What was surprising was the fact that some of these devices, such as the IoT lightbulb, were so insecure that it is beyond what could be considered a mistake,” Dark Cubed reported. “We found that the extent to which the manufacturers and infrastructure associated with these devices communicate with, or is related to, China is shocking and has significant national security implications.”The company also noted that while most IoT devices are manufactured in China, some of the tested devices and their companion apps were secure and didn’t share data.”Unfortunately, consumers have no ability to differentiate between the safe and the dangerous devices given the lack of focus on security by retailers,” Dark Cubed said in its report. Mobile Securitylast_img read more

SpaceXs Starhopper Test Vehicle Takes a Short RaptorPowered Trip

first_imgApril 4, 2019 This story originally appeared on Engadget 1 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now As SpaceX proceeds with development of its Starship vehicle, its first testing out the spacecraft’s Raptor engines. Today a stubby Starhopper test vehicle mounted with a single engine — as opposed to the more advanced Phase 2 version shown above — completed its first tethered hop of just a few inches at the Texas launch site, as spotted by nearby observers. Elon Musk tweeted “All systems green” after the test, which may not have gone far but recalls the early days of Grasshopper rocket tests before we got used to the sight of Falcon 9 rocket engines returning to Earth after successful launches.Musk previously said that suborbital test flights would require three of the engines — the final version of Starship f.k.a BFR will have more — and we’ll be waiting to see when that happens.Starhopper completed tethered hop. All systems green. https://t.co/0m5Bm5slD2— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 4, 2019 Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more