MLS legend Schmid dies at age 65

first_imgFormer Los Angeles Galaxy manager Sigi Schmid has died at the age of 65, his family has announced.Schmid, who has the most wins as a manager in the history of the Major League Soccer, was admitted to the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center earlier in the month, needing a heart transplant.The cause of Schmid’s death was not disclosed, but his family released the following statement, as quoted by ProSoccerUSA:“On Tuesday, December 25, Sigi Schmid passed away at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles due to a personal health matter.”Chile, Alexis SanchezAlexis Sanchez rules out move to David Beckham’s Inter Miami Andrew Smyth – September 5, 2019 Alexis Sanchez reckons he’s still got another “five or six years left” of European football in him amid links of a move to David Beckham’s Inter Miami.“Our family is deeply saddened by his passing and is taking this time to grieve the loss of a tremendous husband, father, leader and mentor.”“We also recognize how much Sigi meant to so many people across the U.S. Soccer landscape and around the world at different levels of the game. That community meant a great deal to him as well, and for that reason, it was important to us that we share the news of his passing.”“While we mourn his loss, we appreciate privacy during this challenging time and will not be issuing further statements. In lieu of flowers or other gifts, the family asks to please consider a memorial gift to support the men’s soccer program at UCLA, Sigi’s alma mater. Donations in memory of Sigi may be directed to the attention of Emily Lerner of UCLA Athletics at 310-206-3302 or elerner@athletics.ucla.edu.”last_img read more

Four men stabbed in bloody Chula Vista brawl

first_imgFour men stabbed in bloody Chula Vista brawl May 20, 2018 John Soderman Posted: May 20, 2018 John Soderman, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsCHULA VISTA (KUSI) — Four people were injured Saturday night, one critically after a stabbing occurred during an apartment complex brawl in Chula Vista.The fight broke at at approximately 11:00 p.m. in the 500 block of Oxford St. in the Villa Granada Apartments,  Lt. John Autolino of the Chula Vista Police Department said.Witnesses say there was a large party at the complex when two men showed up in a car and got in an argument with four males. Once the two men got out of the car the fight began.Officers found four stabbing victims, three with minor wounds, one with more serious injuries, Autolino said.The victim with critical injuries was taken to a nearby hospital, Autolino said. His status is not known at this time.The identity of the suspects are not known at this time. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

TheStreet Experiments With A Freemium Model For Its 50Million Subscription Service

first_img Much of that growth has come through acquisitions, but the company is exploring new models that can help generate organic growth. Its latest attempt is in implementing a metered paywall for its Real Money subscription product. As such, the company has managed to make significant changes to its business model since 2011. While TheStreet has long been a subscription-dominated business, at that inflection point, subscriptions made up about two-thirds of total revenue at $39 million—they’re now 80 percent of revenue and approaching $50 million, up 77 percent in the last two years alone. “We’ve transformed TheStreet.com over the past few years to become less dependent on advertising by emphasizing the sale of lucrative subscriptions,” says Erwin Eichmann, chief business officer for TheStreet. “Real Money is the first subscription service that we are offering on a freemium model, and we’re excited to do so.” “Our impetus for the metered paywall was the simple realization that a larger audience for Real Money means, over time, a larger subscriber base for Real Money,” he says. “We are always looking to increase the number of subscribers for all our services [and] a metered paywall is one of the strategies that could be leveraged for our other subscription services.” Real Money, a collection of articles from more than 30 investment managers and analysts, will allow users access to eight articles per month before they’re hit with a hard wall. From there, subscriptions start at $3 per week and go up to a $16-per-week premium version. Those price points are unchanged from the previous hard wall model.center_img Wary of a fickle ad market, many publishers have been trying to lean more heavily on subscribers for revenue in recent years. TheStreet has done the same, though its market—Wall Street—and its products—investment advice—make the company a unique test case. The idea isn’t novel—Eichmann calls it “both well-established and profitable”—but for a business increasingly (and intentionally) reliant on subscriptions, allowing users free access to a paid product is a calculated risk-versus-reward proposition. Real Money is already one of TheStreet’s three largest subscription services by revenue, and its most popular stock market offering by volume, Eichmann says. The move to a freemium model is not only a gamble on its value, but on the size of the market for it.last_img read more

Apple Card Apple TV Plus Apple Arcade Its just another way to

first_img It’s showtime for Apple’s streaming service The company’s revamped TV app will be on Macs, iPads and, of course, iPhones. The app brings together various streaming services — except, notably, Netflix — in one place and serves up recommendations for what you should watch next. “Everything you saw is amazing on iPhone,” said Peter Stern, Apple vice president of services. The TV app even will come to smart TVs from Samsung, LG, Sony and Vizio and streaming video boxes from Roku and Amazon. “Now that you’ve seen the new Apple TV app, you’re going to want it on all of your screens,” Stern added.Apple didn’t specify where its biggest news of the day, its TV Plus streaming video service, will be available when it goes live, but it’s likely to be found in the same places as the TV app, a feature of iOS, MacOS and smart TVs. Even Oprah made an appearance to promote why she’s working with Apple on Apple TV Plus. Hint: It has a lot to do with the iPhone. “A billion devices, y’all!” Oprah told the crowd. Apple remains the iPhone company. Colin Gillis, analyst, Chatham Road Partners CNET editors break down Apple’s TV Plus event For now, though, those people are out of luck. On Monday, Apple didn’t say a word about any of its services coming to Android or Windows devices. It didn’t even say if its TV content could be accessed through a desktop web browser. And an Apple spokesperson said the company didn’t have more information to share beyond what it said on stage Monday.”People are used to watching content on any device they have at the time, and it’s not always on Apple devices,” Technalysis Research analyst Bob O’Donnell said. “Apple can’t make services truly successful if it’s only on its own devices.”Tiptoeing outside the walled gardenThere are signs Apple may not be a completely walled garden for long. The company has long created a version of its iTunes service that works on Windows computers. That proved to be a smart move from the start, with downloads jumping when iTunes became available on Windows PCs in late 2003, about six months after the service launched on Macs.Since then, however, Apple’s services have primarily stayed inside the Apple ecosystem, aside from Apple Music. There’s an Apple Music app for Android, which Apple first offered as a beta before rolling it out broadly. And in December, the company rolled out Apple Music for Amazon Echo speakers, allowing users to ask the Alexa voice assistant to play tracks from Apple’s streaming service.But Apple’s Android app doesn’t work as flawlessly as the iOS version, and new features often appear months or even years after they hit the iOS app. In January at CES, Apple made yet another step into putting its services on rival devices by partnering with major TV makers. Samsung’s smart TVs will offer support for iTunes movies and TV shows beginning this spring. Samsung TVs will also support AirPlay 2, Apple’s upgraded Wi-Fi audio streaming technology, allowing customers to stream videos, music and other content directly to their TV from an Apple device.While Samsung is the only TV maker to offer iTunes TV and videos on its sets, other companies — LG, Vizio and Sony — will let users stream content from their iPhones, iPads and Macs to their televisions. Phones Tablets Computers Digital Media TV and Movies Overall, Monday’s event was big on hype and short on details. Aside from Apple News Plus, nothing announced could be accessed right away. Apple touted partner after partner for its gaming and TV services, but it didn’t give many details about pricing or when we can subscribe to them. One thing, however, was supremely clear: Despite Apple’s declarations that it wants to become a services powerhouse, at heart it’s still “the iPhone company.”About two-thirds of the company’s revenue comes from its smartphone, an influx of money that helped it become the first trillion-dollar US company. That reliance has become a problem because people have upgraded their devices less often. Apple’s no longer valued at over a trillion dollars, and earlier this year, it reported a rare miss in quarterly sales because of weaker iPhone demand. Apple has an opportunity with its new services to woo people who just like to watch TV, read the news or play games on their mobile devices. People who own iPhones, iPads and Macs already buy into Apple’s message. It’s everyone else, those Android and Windows device owners, who Apple could target as an opportunity for real expansion. • Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors At its event Monday, Apple went even further. Its redesigned TV app will land on Samsung smart TVs this spring, then move to LG, Sony and Vizio TVs. Roku and Amazon Fire TV streaming-video devices also will be supported.But that’s where its openness ends. At least in the beginning, none of the services appear to work with Android or Windows.Closing itself off from Android and Windows devices shuts Apple off from a significant percentage of the phone, tablet and PC markets. About 85 percent of all smartphones run Android, according to IDC, and that’s not changing for the foreseeable future. More than half of the world’s tablets also use Android, according to Net Applications, and over 85 percent of all desktop and laptop computers in the world run Windows, the researcher said.Apple likely will eventually make its services run on rival devices. If it’s serious about becoming more than an iPhone maker, it has to.But no matter how much it does in services, Apple’s reliance on the iPhone isn’t ending anytime soon.”Video streaming is not going to save shares of [Apple] if the iPhone market declines,” Chatham Road Partners analyst Colin Gillis noted. “Apple remains the iPhone company.”The story originally ran at 5 a.m. PT.  Tags 97 Photos 10 Apple is expanding the services it offers, but most of its sales still come from the iPhone.  Screenshot by CNET Apple just can’t shake that iPhone addiction.At a flashy event on Monday, the company time and time again stressed how great its services will work on its mobile devices. For its premium Apple News Plus subscription package, magazines have been designed to take advantage of the iPhone or iPad, adding animated covers and automatically downloading content for convenience. “I can read full magazine issues no matter where or when, right from my phone,” said Wyatt Mitchell, Apple’s director of design for applications, during Monday’s event.The Apple Arcade game subscription service will give Apple device users unlimited access to more than 100 new and exclusive games. “You won’t find these games on any other mobile platform or any other subscription service,” said Ann Thai, a senior product manager for the App Store.And Apple’s new no-fee credit card, Apple Card, requires an iPhone to work. “It can do all sorts of things no other credit card can do,” said Jennifer Bailey, head of Apple Pay. “For starters, you don’t have to wait days to get your card. Just sign up on your iPhone.” Commentscenter_img Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Apple See also reading • Apple Card, Apple TV Plus, Apple Arcade: It’s just another way to say iPhone Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? 6:58 Now playing: Watch this: See All Apple TV Plus is the ultimate test of Apple’s brand magic Apple event 2019: Apple Card, TV Plus, News Plus, Arcade and everything just announced Apple TV app coming to Macs, Roku, smart TVs in 2019 Share your voice iOS 12 Android 10 (Android Q) Amazon Google LG Microsoft Roku Samsung Sony Vizio Apple Windows 10last_img read more

Contracted Poll Finds 20 Percent Of Workers Freelance

first_imgArun Sundararajan, a management professor at New York University and author of The Sharing Economy, says “this is the work arrangement for the future.” The new normal will be freelance work. “Twenty years from now, I don’t think a typical college graduate is going to expect that full-time employment is their path to building a career,” Sundararajan says.He says that will ultimately lead to many other changes, from education to social structures and public services.A short distance from Orrick’s offices, Wheeling’s mayor, Glenn Elliott, is starting to think through the implications of that.Elliott himself once worked as a contractor at a law firm and says contract work holds both great promise and great peril for the city. On the plus side, he sees more economic opportunities, if it can attract more companies like Orrick. On the other hand, he worries how this also changes the fundamental social contract between employers and workers.“I don’t think that loyalty necessarily exists between employers and their employees that used to be there,” Elliott says.Yuki Noguchi/NPRWheeling Mayor Glenn Elliott says he worries how the rise of independent contractors is changing the fundamental social contract between employers and workers.Those looser ties will shift more responsibility to contract workers. They must handle saving for retirement and their health insurance on their own.“But some people, despite their best efforts, just aren’t going to be successful in doing that,” Elliott says. “What’s going to happen to those who fall through the cracks? Because the 1950s model of retirement and getting your pension check every year from your company is not a realistic model for a lot of people, increasingly.”The public safety net — the budgets for fire departments and social services — is already strained, he says, by the area’s opioid problems, among other things. A future where fewer workers have benefits won’t help.Elliott expresses frustration with partisan battles at the state and federal level, while cities like his struggle to figure out how to plan for the future.“It’s a much broader problem than Wheeling,” he says. But “as a country we need to be having a conversation, which we’re not really having right now.”Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Share Photo by JC SUllivanThe Orrick law firm’s modern operations, using artificial intelligence and contract lawyers, are located in an old-metal stamping factory in Wheeling, W.Va.A new NPR/Marist poll finds that 1 in 5 jobs in America is made up of workers under contract. Within a decade, contractors and freelancers could make up half of the American workforce. Workers across all industries and at all professional levels will be touched by the movement toward independent work — one without the constraints, or benefits, of full-time employment. Policymakers are just starting to talk about the implications.In a weeklong series, NPR will explore many aspects of this change.In an old metal-stamping factory that was once part of Wheeling, W.Va.’s industrial past, a law firm has set up a futuristic model for how to get legal work done. Unlike the old factory, it relies heavily on new kinds of work arrangements.“Contractors are hired by the hour,” says Daryl Shetterly, director of the Orrick firm’s analytics division. “So we might have 30 people working today, and tomorrow we might have 80.”Tenure for workers in the building used to be measured in decades. Now it might last a few days for the workers there today. While the building has had a facelift, Shetterly says, “it is a factory in that we work to drive efficiency and discipline into every mouse click.”The division is a kind of processing center, using artificial intelligence tools and cheaper lawyers to speed up the handling of routine tasks, such as sorting and tagging documents. That frees other lawyers to focus on more high-end work.It’s emblematic of the kind of contract work expanding into every corner of the economy. Machines are siphoning off basic tasks, and temporary workers allow flexibility to size up and down. In the legal field, there are online platforms that match freelance lawyers with clients. It’s like dating profiles — but with customer reviews and billing assistance.The legal job market, in other words, is fragmenting, and with it, its workforce.“Lots of people go into law expecting that they’re headed to a secure, well-paying, intellectually satisfying, high-prestige job, and lots of those people find out that’s not what they’re headed to,” says Gillian Hadfield, who studies legal markets at the University of Southern California.She says the speed with which business evolves these days forces everyone — from businesses themselves to suppliers to the competition — to respond quickly. Employers need specialized expertise on demand, just not for the long term.It’s not just business driving the trend. Surveys show a large majority of freelancers are free agents by choice.Yuki Noguchi/NPRJohn Vensel is a contract attorney at the Orrick law firm in Wheeling, W.Va. He says contract work is today’s economic reality.John Vensel is a contract attorney at Orrick who grew up a few miles from Wheeling, on the other side of the Pennsylvania state line. In his 20s, he was a freelance paralegal by day and a gig musician by night.“I actually wanted to be a rock star,” he says. But these days there are no edgy vestiges of a former rocker, only a 47-year-old family man cooing over cellphone photos of his children, Grace and Gabe.In the two decades in between, Vensel worked full-time corporate jobs. But he was laid off in 2010, on the eve of his graduation from his night-school law program. He graduated with huge piles of debt, into one of the worst job markets.“It was terrible; it was like a nuclear bomb went off,” he says. “My son had just been born. … We’ve been kind of recovering ever since.”For a time, Vensel commuted three hours round-trip to a full-time job in Pittsburgh. But more recently, he quit and took up contracting to stay near home in Wheeling.“So, like my father, he’s in the hospital right now which is like five minutes away, and I’m getting updates on my phone,” he explains, glancing at the device. “And if I need to be there, I can be there in five minutes.”He says contract work is today’s economic reality. Contracting allows employers to test workers out, he says, but he ultimately is hoping to land a full-time position, with benefits. A new NPR/Marist poll shows that 34 percent of part-time workers are looking for full-time work.That may be increasingly difficult. Currently, 1 in 5 workers is a contract worker, the poll shows. Within a decade, many labor economists believe freelancers will outnumber full timers.Vensel draws a contrast with his father, who retired after working 35 years at the Postal Service.“He has a pension; we don’t have pensions anymore,” Vensel says. “It’s a totally different world.”Sixty-five percent of part-time workers and a little more than half of contract workers work without benefits, according to the NPR/Marist poll.last_img read more