Jonquel Jones returns to WNBA Connecticut Sun

first_img#MagneticMediaNews#JonquelJonesWNBA#ConnecticutSun Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppConnecticut, May 9th 2017: Jonquel Jones is back in the WNBA with the Connecticut Sun, following a successful off-season in Korea.    She returned to the US, ending eight points on a 4-6 shooting night from the field and adding seven rebounds in the Sun’s 81-72 win over the Chicago Sky last Tuesday.In Korea, Jones took the Foreign Most Valuable Player award, Defensive Player of the Year award and was named “Best Five” in the league.     She received one vote in the 2016 WNBA Sixth Woman of the Year tally to finish in a 5-way tie for fifth behind winner Jantel Lavender.    The Sun will open the season on May 13, hosting the Atlanta Dream.center_img Related Items:last_img read more

Star Trek on Mars NASA spots Starfleet logo in dune footprint

first_img“Enterprising viewers will make the discovery that these features look conspicuously like a famous logo,” the team quipped.The intriguing Mars formation has a long geologic history. It started as a crescent-shaped dune that became an island in a sea of lava, but the sand eventually blew away in the wind. “These are also called ‘dune casts’ and record the presence of dunes that were surrounded by lava,” planetary scientist Ross Beyer explained. A wider MRO view of the landscape shows more of the insignia-like impressions.marsdunefootprintEnlarge ImageThese “dune footprints” have some accidental Star Trek flair. NASA/JPL/University of Arizona Beyer made sure to point out the resemblance to the Star Trek logo is “only a coincidence.” There is no credible evidence of Star Trek fans having reached the surface of Mars. Yet. Share your voice 41 weird objects seen on Mars, explained Enlarge ImageThis Mars dune cast looks like it should be on Captain Kirk’s chest. NASA/JPL/University of Arizona NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter looks down on the Red Planet and sees all sorts of fantastical formations that resemble everything from Beaker the Muppet to Pac-Man. A new MRO view will inspire you to whip out your Vulcan salute.The MRO HiRise camera team at the University of Arizona on Wednesday highlighted a Martian sand dune formation that could be a doppelganger for the classic swooping Starfleet logo. Tags Comments 43 Photos Caption Spotlight (12 Jun 2019): Dune Footprints in HellasEnterprising viewers will make the discovery that these features look conspicuously like a famous logo.More: https://t.co/CAq5xBbDwfNASA/JPL/University of Arizona#Mars #science pic.twitter.com/N5MfKQPiYt— HiRISE (NASA) (@HiRISE) June 12, 2019 Sci-Tech 8 NASA Space Star Treklast_img read more

Party Politics Texas Edition Ep 11 A Very Special Session

first_img X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listencenter_img 00:00 /16:44 Public domain images.Yeehaw! Hang on, everybody!On this episode of Party Politics: Texas Edition, co-hosts Jay Aiyer and Brandon Rottinghaus break down these tumultuous topics in Texas political news:The Ken Paxton rulingJames Dickey elected as Texas GOP chairmanSan Antonio and Austin have announced they will file suit to stop Texas’ new immigration enforcement law, Senate Bill 4Hurricane season is now! Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush says Texas is not preparedThe Beverly Hillbillies in reverse: the Californians are moving to Texas.Then the profs dig deep into the Special Session. By the way, don’t forget to check out our national episodes of Party Politics, too.Party Politics is produced by Dacia Clay, Edel Howlin and Laura Lucas. Our audio engineer is Todd Hulslander. This article is part of the Party Politics podcast Sharelast_img read more

Advanced Robotic Arm Controlled by Monkeys Thoughts w Video

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have demonstrated a monkey controlling an advanced robotic arm by using its thoughts. The experiments were led by Dr. Andrew Schwartz, a professor of neurobiology and involved a high degree of complexity in the robotic arm, the level of control, and the intricacy of the manipulations. © 2010 PhysOrg.com This is not the first time that Dr. Schwartz implanted sensors in a monkey’s brain to control a robotic arm. Back in May of 2008 experiments were conducted by Dr. Schwartz, using a simpler mechanical arm, to teach a monkey to feed itself. This was a four-degrees-of-freedom arm with shoulder joints, elbow, and a simple gripper. In this demonstration researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have taught a monkey to use its thoughts to control an advanced robotic arm and perform elaborate maneuvers with it. Credit: University of Pittsburgh In the video above the monkey (right side of video) uses its right arm to tap a button which triggers the robotic manipulator to position a black knob to an arbitrary position. The monkey is then seen controlling its articulated robotic arm to grasp the knob.After touching the knob the monkey places its mouth on a straw to be rewarded with a drink. By constant repetition the monkey eventually starts placing its mouth on the straw before touching the knob knowing that a drink is coming.This advanced robotic arm has seven-degrees-of-freedom as compared to the four-degrees-of-freedom arm back in 2008. The added three more degrees of freedom adds an articulated wrist which can perform pitch, roll and yaw movements. These movements enable the monkey to precisely turn the knob by rotating the mechanical wrist.By putting the brain in direct communications with machines, researchers will one day be able to engineer and operate advanced prosthetics in a natural way to help paralyzed people live a close to normal life.As of this writing Dr. Schwartz and his colleagues have not published the detailed results of their latest experiments.You can now listen to all PhysOrg.com podcasts at www.physorg.com/podcasts-news/ Citation: Advanced Robotic Arm Controlled by Monkey’s Thoughts (w/ Video) (2010, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-06-advanced-robotic-arm-monkeys-thoughts.htmlcenter_img Woman outfitted with robotic arm Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In the video above monkeys in the Dr. Schwartz’s lab are able to move a robotic arm to feed themselves marshmallows and chunks of fruit while their own arms are restrained.In the experiments conducted this year two sensors were implanted into the monkey’s brain. One was implanted in the hand area and the second in the arm area of its motor cortex. The sensors monitor the firing of motor neurons and send data to the computer that translates the patterns into commands that control the robotic arm.last_img read more

Speed of light drops to zero at exceptional points

first_img More information: Tamar Goldzak et al. “Light stops at exceptional points.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.013901, Also at arXiv:1709.10172 [physics.optics] Light, which travels at a speed of 300,000 km/sec in a vacuum, can be slowed down and even stopped completely by methods that involve trapping the light inside crystals or ultracold clouds of atoms. Now in a new study, researchers have theoretically demonstrated a new way to bring light to a standstill: they show that light stops at “exceptional points,” which are points at which two light modes come together and coalesce, in waveguides that have a certain kind of symmetry. ‘Exceptional points’ give rise to counterintuitive physical effects Explore further Unlike most other methods that are used to stop light, the new method can be tuned to work with a wide range of frequencies and bandwidths, which may offer an important advantage for future slow-light applications.The researchers, Tamar Goldzak and Nimrod Moiseyev at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, along with Alexei A. Mailybaev at the Instituto de Matemática Pura e Aplicada (IMPA) in Rio de Janeiro, have published a paper on stopping light at exceptional points in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.As the researchers explain, exceptional points can be created in waveguides in a straightforward way, by varying the gain/loss parameters so that two light modes coalesce (combine into one mode). Although light stops at these exceptional points, in most systems much of the light is lost at these points. The researchers showed that this problem can be fixed by using waveguides with parity-time (PT) symmetry, since this symmetry ensures that the gain and loss are always balanced. As a result, the light intensity remains constant when the light approaches the exceptional point, eliminating losses.To release the stopped light and accelerate it back up to normal speed, the scientists showed that the gain/loss parameters can simply be reversed. The most important feature of the new method, however, is that the exceptional points can be adjusted to work with any frequency of light, again simply by tuning the gain/loss parameters. The researchers also expect that this method can be used for other types of waves besides light, such as acoustic waves. They plan to further investigate these possibilities in the future. Citation: Speed of light drops to zero at ‘exceptional points’ (2018, January 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-exceptional.htmlcenter_img © 2018 Phys.org Journal information: Physical Review Letters Artistic image. Credit: pixabay This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more