TheStreet Experiments With A Freemium Model For Its 50Million Subscription Service

first_img Much of that growth has come through acquisitions, but the company is exploring new models that can help generate organic growth. Its latest attempt is in implementing a metered paywall for its Real Money subscription product. As such, the company has managed to make significant changes to its business model since 2011. While TheStreet has long been a subscription-dominated business, at that inflection point, subscriptions made up about two-thirds of total revenue at $39 million—they’re now 80 percent of revenue and approaching $50 million, up 77 percent in the last two years alone. “We’ve transformed TheStreet.com over the past few years to become less dependent on advertising by emphasizing the sale of lucrative subscriptions,” says Erwin Eichmann, chief business officer for TheStreet. “Real Money is the first subscription service that we are offering on a freemium model, and we’re excited to do so.” “Our impetus for the metered paywall was the simple realization that a larger audience for Real Money means, over time, a larger subscriber base for Real Money,” he says. “We are always looking to increase the number of subscribers for all our services [and] a metered paywall is one of the strategies that could be leveraged for our other subscription services.” Real Money, a collection of articles from more than 30 investment managers and analysts, will allow users access to eight articles per month before they’re hit with a hard wall. From there, subscriptions start at $3 per week and go up to a $16-per-week premium version. Those price points are unchanged from the previous hard wall model.center_img Wary of a fickle ad market, many publishers have been trying to lean more heavily on subscribers for revenue in recent years. TheStreet has done the same, though its market—Wall Street—and its products—investment advice—make the company a unique test case. The idea isn’t novel—Eichmann calls it “both well-established and profitable”—but for a business increasingly (and intentionally) reliant on subscriptions, allowing users free access to a paid product is a calculated risk-versus-reward proposition. Real Money is already one of TheStreet’s three largest subscription services by revenue, and its most popular stock market offering by volume, Eichmann says. The move to a freemium model is not only a gamble on its value, but on the size of the market for it.last_img read more

Smart lightbulbs could be exporting your personal data to China

first_img 5 Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: 3:16 7 ways smart home devices can help you sleep better Tags Comments Smart lightbulb at CES 2019. David Becker / Getty Images Today, you can operate almost everything in your house from your phone. But, like most technology, nothing is perfect. While smart lightbulbs themselves aren’t dangerous, the apps and platforms that control them might be. Last month, Dark Cubed, an American cybersecurity company, released its State of IoT Security report and detailed potential security threats in smart home devices. Dark Cubed said it purchased several in-home smart devices that can be found at Walmart, Amazon, Best Buy or other stores and tested their security. While the company said that it wasn’t surprising that most of the apps weren’t secure, the IoT (Internet of Things) lightbulbs were even worse. According to Dark Cubed, simply dimming your smart lightbulb could be enabling real-time location sharing. “What was surprising was the fact that some of these devices, such as the IoT lightbulb, were so insecure that it is beyond what could be considered a mistake,” Dark Cubed reported. “We found that the extent to which the manufacturers and infrastructure associated with these devices communicate with, or is related to, China is shocking and has significant national security implications.”The company also noted that while most IoT devices are manufactured in China, some of the tested devices and their companion apps were secure and didn’t share data.”Unfortunately, consumers have no ability to differentiate between the safe and the dangerous devices given the lack of focus on security by retailers,” Dark Cubed said in its report. Mobile Securitylast_img read more

Stranger author Omair Tarique says passion is contagious

first_imgOmair TariquePR HandoutThe age of Internet dawned on us with the promise of liberation, connecting millions together and providing a platform for each. Artists all around the world found a place to showcase their work thus every hidden dairy found a safe space, and Omair Tarique was not hesitant to join this sudden salvation of a generation.The twenty-two-year-old writer, who hails from the city of Kolkata, is currently pursuing English Honours from Calcutta University, found the love for written word in his early teens. Not only did Tarique believe in the power of language and the various repercussions it can have on people, but for him writing is a doorway to another world, a break from reality. He made his publication debut on May 10 2017 with Stranger a collection of short stories. Right now, he is working on his next book.It was not a surprise when Tarique co-founded The Scribbled Stories with Mohit Kumar on July 2, 2015. Today, India’s largest storytelling platform has become a hideaway for most of the millennials, with the following of almost 2 million on Facebook and Instagram. In the writing community, having a FanPost with your name on The Scribbled Stories is akin to a pilgrimage completed.If Omair found a haven in writing, he found peace in reading. The young author is widely known for his fondness of books: from organizing monthly Readathons, having his own online book club to reviewing books and just encouraging people to start reading, this man is full of passion.Some people know him as a ‘Book Fairy’ — if he adores a book, he will leave a copy of the same in cafés for others to find. On most days, Tarique survives on coffee, good movies and music whilst drowning in work. However, now on weekends he hosts an AMA for his readers, largely trying to help teenagers in angst and every person who thinks they are alone.He manages a team of twenty-seven writers at The Scribbled Stories, who come from different countries and walks of life. Tarique also curates stories submitted at the organisation’s submission portal. With his team, he has conducted various workshops in colleges across the country — from IITs to Liberal Arts Colleges.They say if the people you work with respect you, you cannot ask for anything else, and Tarique’s team carries nothing but admiration for him. Ansab Amir, Curator at The Scribbled Stories considers Omair as his supportive mentor and a well-balanced team member while Harshpreet, the Community Manager said, “Omair is more empathetic than you would ever imagine, the kind where he has observed you enough to know what will make you feel better when you are not okay. I doubt I will find a better colleague.”During his TEDx Talk at KL University, Tarique said, “Passion is contagious. I am passionate about reading, about writing, about stories. If you are passionate about something, like music, go back home after this event, pick up your instrument and record yourself playing something. Upload it even if it is bad. The way I see it, you either improve with criticism or get more confident with support… Each of you sitting in this room is an idea. And ideas can change the world.”He encourages every person to unabashedly just be themselves, the only way one can live their truth. Despite having marked numerous milestones just at the age of twenty-two, Omair Tarique is extremely grounded and keeps striving for more. Perhaps the reason behind his accumulating pile of successes. His journey stands as epitome of inspiration to many every day saying you do not need to speak in order to leave a mark.last_img read more