Citibank Executives Pay Courtesy Call on the Prime Minister

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, July 31, 2017 – Nassau – Citibank executives paid a courtesy call on Prime Minister Dr. the Hon. Hubert Minnis, July 31, at the Office of the Prime Minister.   Pictured from left: Raymond Gatcliffe, Regional CEO for the Caribbean and Corporate Bank Head for Central America & the Caribbean; Margaret Butler, Citi Country Office; Prime Minister Minnis; and Christopher Dorsett, Local Corporate Bank Head. Release: BIS(Photo/OPM Media Services)last_img read more

How Amazon convinces police to sign up with Ring

first_img Now playing: Watch this: 5 Photos Comments Emails between police and Ring showed tactics the Amazon-owned video doorbell company used to convince officers to join its program. Chris Monroe/CNET Up to 250 police departments have joined Amazon’s Ring Neighbors program, a neighborhood watch app, but these deals don’t happen overnight. For the Chula Vista police department in California, Ring spent more than a year offering discounts and applying peer pressure with constant reminders and emails to convince officers to sign up. The Chula Vista police department signed up for Ring’s Neighbors program in May, but the courtship started in March 2018, according to documents obtained by CNET through a Freedom of Information Act request. The video doorbell company pitched the program to the police department two months before it was publicly announced.These documents detail how Ring’s staff convinced a local police department in California to join Neighbors, an app released by the company in May 2018. When police didn’t respond, Ring would follow up by noting neighboring law enforcement agencies that have joined, pushing for the Chula Vista police to join them.The tactics also offer a window into how Ring, which retail giant Amazon purchased last year for $839 million, has struck partnerships with police departments across the country.  Police consider it a tool for obtaining video in investigations, as well as creating surveillance networks in residential neighborhoods. But these relationships are cause for alarm among privacy advocates, who raise concerns that a tech giant like Amazon is helping police create surveillance networks.  “A long term goal for CVPD is to have a real-time crime center which will be doing a myriad of things. One of those things would be leveraging civilian surveillance cameras in the city to aid us in solving crime and learning about crime patterns,” CVPD’s community policing Sgt. Frank Giaime said in an email to Ring. “As the crime analysis unit’s capacity increases, I would like to integrate a program like this to help us build a partnership with the community through technology.”Ring didn’t respond to a request for comment.”No, the Chula Vista Police Department did not feel pressured in any way to partner with Ring’s Neighbors app,” the CVPD’s investigations division Capt. Phil Collum said in an email. For the CVPD, the courtship began with a cold pitch. Discounts ringingThe first email from Ring’s outreach coordinator to the Chula Vista police department came in March 2018.The message opened with an introduction and a comment on an increase in crime in the area.”I recently came across this News clip of an uptick in home break-ins in Chula Vista,” the coordinator wrote. “As an extension of Ring’s Neighborhoods initiative, I’m reaching out to share an offer to all public safety agencies that actively participate in either crime prevention or community policing.” He offered to donate a free video doorbell, as well as discounts of up to $50 for more cameras. The email also referenced a Ring pilot program that claimed it reduced crime rates. MIT Technology Review scrutinized that study last October and found that the evidence was flimsy.  The Chula Vista police didn’t respond for 10 days, and the outreach coordinator followed up, this time with a flier on different Ring products and a $50 promo code for every officer in the department on video doorbells.CPVD responded and said it would follow up, giving Ring a foot in the door. There’s no email communication between the two until about three months later, in May 2018. The same coordinator said  Raymond Pollum, Ring’s head of law enforcement partnerships, would be in the San Diego area demonstrating tools for other police departments.Pollum met with the CVPD department on May 3, 2018, and provided a demonstration of Neighbors and the police dashboard. He followed up with an email four days later and attached a memorandum of understanding “for consideration,” even though CVPD hadn’t agreed to join the program yet.screen-shot-2019-08-22-at-12-30-27-pmChula Vista’s police department promoting a Ring giveaway for National Night Out in August. Instagram The police department responded a month later, telling Pollum it sent the proposed contract to higher-ups in June. When he didn’t get a response for another month, Pollum followed up a month later, sending police a link to a crime solved in Tampa, Florida, through Ring’s cameras. CVPD didn’t respond to that message.At the same time, the department was coordinating National Night Out, an annual police-community event for promoting neighborhood safety. Ring was a sponsor for it, and its coordinator promoted contests and giveaways for free video doorbells and discounts at CVPD’s event.”We appreciate the goodies you’re sending and are most interested in having someone man a booth,” Angela Gaines, CVPD’s police community relations officer, told Ring in an email.Ring had brought 20 video doorbell kits for the police community event that August.PressuringThe peer pressure campaign started in January 2019, after surrounding police departments partnered with Ring. Pollum had given the department another demo, and sent the CVPD the memorandum of understanding again on Feb. 1. Giaime told Ring that the department was “eager” to sign the contract but needed to send it off to the chain of command for approval. He told Pollum it would take a few weeks to get a formal presentation together. Four days after Ring’s demonstration, Pollum followed up with another email. “We executed the La Mesa PD MOU yesterday, so they will join Carlsbad PD and Oceanside PD as San Diego LE portal participants,” Pollum wrote. “Not sure if peer pressure is a good thing or not, but wanted to at least make you aware that they are joining the program and will be onboarded shortly.”About three weeks later, on Feb. 21, Pollum followed up and told the sergeant that the La Mesa police department joined Ring, and the San Diego sheriff’s department approved the MOU. Again, Giaime told Pollum he would need a few weeks to put together the presentation and get approval from the command staff.  Ring followed up in a month and a half, listing even more police departments that are signing up with the company. “As Chula Vista Police Department considers the benefits of gaining access to the Neighbors Portal, I thought it might be helpful to know of other agencies in the area that have joined,” Pollum wrote on April 2. He listed the San Diego County sheriff’s department, along with police in Oceanside, Carlsbad and La Mesa, and noted that officers in Escondido and National City were considering the program. Six days after that, Ring sent another email to CVPD with the same message. “SD Sheriff’s joined a couple of weeks ago so I’m hoping to get the other major cities in San Diego onboard quickly. Can you give me a quick update on where things stand?” Pollum wrote. Giaime responded with an apology, noting that the police “had a lot of things going on” during that time.  He made the presentation to higher-ups on April 26, and four days later, the Chula Vista Police Department signed Ring’s contract, which went into effect on May 1. The department officially announced it joined three months later, on its Instagram page.After a year of emails, discounts and peer pressure from Ring’s executives, CVPD became one of hundreds of police departments to join Ring.   Share your voice Ring’s smart doorbell keeps a close eye on your housecenter_img 4:14 68 Ring convinced police to join its network through peer… Tags Security Cameras Security Ring Amazonlast_img read more

BGB member arrested with yaba tablets

first_imgPolice arrested a member of Border Guard Bangladesh (BGB) along with 2,000 yaba tablets from a bus at a bus station at Hneela union in Teknaf upazila on Sunday night, reports UNB.The arrestee was Mohammad Enamul Haque, 35, sepoy of BGB-2 Teknaf battalion.Pradip Kumar Das, officer-in-charge of Teknaf model police station, said that on information, a team of police raided the Dhaka-bound ‘Saint-Martin Service’ bus around 9:00am and arrested Enamul along with the yaba tablets.last_img

Myanmar builds military bases in Rohingya homes mosques Amnesty

first_imgThis handout combination image of two satellite photographs released by Amnesty International and DigitalGlobe on 12 March, 2018 shows before and after images taken on 6 September, 2017 and 5 February, 2018 of new structures and helipads being built over agricultural fields in the village of Pa Da Kar Ywar Thit in Myanmar`s Rakhine State. Photo: AFPAfter driving nearly 700,000 Rohingya Muslims out of the country, Myanmar’s military is building bases where some of their homes and mosques once stood, Amnesty International said on Monday, citing new evidence from satellite imagery.A harsh security response to attacks by Rohingya insurgents on 25 Aug sent members of the mostly stateless minority fleeing to Bangladesh and saw more than 350 villages destroyed by fire in western Myanmar’s Rakhine state.An Amnesty report published on Monday echoed previous ones by saying the remains of some of those villages – and some buildings not previously damaged – had been bulldozed.As well as rapid housing and road construction in the area, at least three new security facilities were under construction, the global human rights group said. In one case, Rohingya villagers who had remained in Myanmar were forcibly evicted to make way for a base, it said.“What we are seeing in Rakhine State is a land grab by the military on a dramatic scale,” Tirana Hassan, Amnesty’s crisis response director, said in a statement. “New bases are being erected to house the very same security forces that have committed crimes against humanity against Rohingya.”At least four mosques that had not been wrecked by fire have been destroyed, or had their roofing or other materials removed, since late December, a time when significant conflict was not reported in the area, Amnesty said.In one Rohingya village, satellite imagery showed buildings for a new border police post appearing next to where a recently demolished mosque had stood.This handout combination image of two satellite photographs released by Amnesty International and DigitalGlobe on 12 March, 2018 shows before and after images taken on 25 October, 2017 and 27 February, 2018 of new structures and fencing built over the previously burnt village of Kan Kya in Myanmar`s Rakhine state. Photo: AFPSpokespeople for the government of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and the military were not immediately available for comment. Myanmar officials have said villages were being bulldozed to make way for new homes for returning refugees.Myanmar has asked for “clear evidence” to support the conclusion of the United Nations and others that ethnic cleansing has taken place in Rakhine.Myanmar and Bangladesh reached a deal in November to repatriate those who fled. Myanmar has said temporary camps to house returnees are ready, but the process has yet to start.Amnesty said Myanmar’s “reshaping” of the region where the Rohingya lived appeared to be designed to accommodate more security forces and non-Rohingya villagers, and could deter refugees from agreeing to return.”Rohingya who fled death and destruction at the hands of the security forces are unlikely to find the prospect of living in close proximity to those same forces conducive to a safe return,” the group said, “especially given the continuing lack of accountability for human rights violations.”last_img

UPDATE Family Of Houston Immigrant Says They Are Hurting After He Was

first_img Share Photo courtesy of the Andrés familyThese montage of photos show Carlos Andrés, who is originally from Guatemala, with his family.The family of a Guatemalan man recently arrested by Immigration Customs and Enforcement (ICE) agents in Houston said Friday they are hurting because he is the bread-winner, and contended they deem his detention unfair because, according to them, he doesn’t have a criminal record.The wife and children of Carlos Andres-Elias, 30, spoke at a press conference organized by the pro-immigration reform group Immigrant Families and Students in the Struggle (FIEL, by its Spanish acronym).According to César Espinosa, FIEL’s executive director, Andres-Elias works in the construction sector.Andres-Elias is married to Marcela Rivera, 31 years-old and originally from Mexico, with whom he has fathered five children. All of Andres-Elias children were born in the United States and one of them has a learning disability, according to Rivera.FIEL’s Espinosa, who cited Rivera and Jorge Cantú –Andres-Elias’ immigration lawyer– as his sources explained that Andres-Elias had been previously deported in December 2005, even though he had been granted a hearing with an immigration judge. He re-entered the U.S. without the proper immigration documents in February 2006 and the fact that he had not attended his immigration hearing in 2005 is what triggered an “order of removal,” Espinosa claims.Leticia Zamarripa, an ICE spokeswoman, confirmed in an email sent to Houston Public Media that Andres-Elias “illegally entered the country Dec. 10, 2005, and was deported on Dec. 30, 2005.”Zamarripa added that Andres-Elias illegally re-entered in the U.S. in 2006 and that constitutes a felony.Rivera, Andres-Elias’ wife, said ICE agents detained her husband  on January 19th this year at an apartment complex located in southwest Houston, where they live, as he was getting ready to leave for work.Rivera told Houston Public Media that her husband told her by phone –after he had been detained– that the ICE agents were not specifically looking for him, but for other people. However, according to the wife, after asking Andres-Elias and a co-worker some questions, the agents decided to detain them.ICE’s Zamarripa noted in her email that the apartment complex where Andres-Elias lives “was identified as part of a targeted enforcement operation.”No work permitAccording to Rivera, Andres-Elias showed the ICE agents a consular ID issued by Guatemala, his country of origin, but he then admitted he did not have a work permit.“It is unjust what they are doing to my husband, migration (authorities), because my husband is not a criminal, he is not a delinquent, he was simply going to work,” Rivera stressed at the press conference.Asked about what she plans to do in the immediate future, Rivera said that she is facing a “complicated” situation because her husband “was the one that worked, he was the one that covered the expenses at our household.”According to Rivera, Andres-Elias is currently at a detention facility for undocumented immigrants located in Conroe, about 40 miles north of Houston. He was denied a bail bond during a hearing that took place this week.last_img read more

Negative feedback may trigger immoral behaviour

first_imgDo you have a workplace atmosphere sans motivation and constant cribbing from your boss about performance? The negative feedback from seniors may lead to endorsement of immoral behaviour in employees, warns a study.“Strongly held professional goals, when combined with public criticism of our potential in that field, can have unintended effects on ethical behaviour for some,” said lead researcher Ana Gantman from New York University.For the study, researchers conducted three experiments with students intending to enter business, law and STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) fields. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’In the first study, business students took a mock aptitude test which purported to measure their potential in the field, with some told they performed well in the exam and others informed they did poorly. The results, appeared in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, showed that those highly motivated to enter the business world and who were told they did poorly in the test, were more likely to endorse the immoral act — breaking the contract — than were those who were informed they did well.Similarly, in the second research, students who were determined to enter the legal field and told they performed poorly in the test, were comparatively more likely to say they performed these “immoral” behaviours.The researchers conducted a third experiment involving students, who were told they were taking a test measuring their potential to successfully major in business or STEM fields.last_img read more