Griffiths grateful for support after break from football

first_imgCeltic striker Leigh Griffiths has thanked fans and the club for supporting him after news broke on Wednesday that he will be taking a break from football.Celtic manager Brendan Rodgers confirmed on Wednesday that Griffiths will be taking a  break from football.Leigh will be taken out of football now for a little period of time,” Rodgers said on Wednesday.“Leigh has had ongoing issues now for a number of months and he has done amazing to play to the level and score some of the goals he has.”Leicester City, Manchester UnitedMatch Preview: Manchester United vs Leicester City Boro Tanchev – September 13, 2019 Old Trafford is the venue for the Premier League encounter between Manchester United and Leicester City, which kicks off at 16:00 (CET) on Saturday.The striker today said he was grateful for the messages of support from Celtic and it’s supporters and has vowed to come back “better and stronger”“I just wanted to thank everyone at the club and so many Celtic fans and other people who have sent me such kind and powerful messages of support,” Griffiths told Sky Sports.“I thank you all sincerely and want to let you know I’m doing all I can to come back as soon as possible, a better and stronger person.”last_img read more

How Amazon convinces police to sign up with Ring

first_img Now playing: Watch this: 5 Photos Comments Emails between police and Ring showed tactics the Amazon-owned video doorbell company used to convince officers to join its program. Chris Monroe/CNET Up to 250 police departments have joined Amazon’s Ring Neighbors program, a neighborhood watch app, but these deals don’t happen overnight. For the Chula Vista police department in California, Ring spent more than a year offering discounts and applying peer pressure with constant reminders and emails to convince officers to sign up. The Chula Vista police department signed up for Ring’s Neighbors program in May, but the courtship started in March 2018, according to documents obtained by CNET through a Freedom of Information Act request. The video doorbell company pitched the program to the police department two months before it was publicly announced.These documents detail how Ring’s staff convinced a local police department in California to join Neighbors, an app released by the company in May 2018. When police didn’t respond, Ring would follow up by noting neighboring law enforcement agencies that have joined, pushing for the Chula Vista police to join them.The tactics also offer a window into how Ring, which retail giant Amazon purchased last year for $839 million, has struck partnerships with police departments across the country.  Police consider it a tool for obtaining video in investigations, as well as creating surveillance networks in residential neighborhoods. But these relationships are cause for alarm among privacy advocates, who raise concerns that a tech giant like Amazon is helping police create surveillance networks.  “A long term goal for CVPD is to have a real-time crime center which will be doing a myriad of things. One of those things would be leveraging civilian surveillance cameras in the city to aid us in solving crime and learning about crime patterns,” CVPD’s community policing Sgt. Frank Giaime said in an email to Ring. “As the crime analysis unit’s capacity increases, I would like to integrate a program like this to help us build a partnership with the community through technology.”Ring didn’t respond to a request for comment.”No, the Chula Vista Police Department did not feel pressured in any way to partner with Ring’s Neighbors app,” the CVPD’s investigations division Capt. Phil Collum said in an email. For the CVPD, the courtship began with a cold pitch. Discounts ringingThe first email from Ring’s outreach coordinator to the Chula Vista police department came in March 2018.The message opened with an introduction and a comment on an increase in crime in the area.”I recently came across this News clip of an uptick in home break-ins in Chula Vista,” the coordinator wrote. “As an extension of Ring’s Neighborhoods initiative, I’m reaching out to share an offer to all public safety agencies that actively participate in either crime prevention or community policing.” He offered to donate a free video doorbell, as well as discounts of up to $50 for more cameras. The email also referenced a Ring pilot program that claimed it reduced crime rates. MIT Technology Review scrutinized that study last October and found that the evidence was flimsy.  The Chula Vista police didn’t respond for 10 days, and the outreach coordinator followed up, this time with a flier on different Ring products and a $50 promo code for every officer in the department on video doorbells.CPVD responded and said it would follow up, giving Ring a foot in the door. There’s no email communication between the two until about three months later, in May 2018. The same coordinator said  Raymond Pollum, Ring’s head of law enforcement partnerships, would be in the San Diego area demonstrating tools for other police departments.Pollum met with the CVPD department on May 3, 2018, and provided a demonstration of Neighbors and the police dashboard. He followed up with an email four days later and attached a memorandum of understanding “for consideration,” even though CVPD hadn’t agreed to join the program yet.screen-shot-2019-08-22-at-12-30-27-pmChula Vista’s police department promoting a Ring giveaway for National Night Out in August. Instagram The police department responded a month later, telling Pollum it sent the proposed contract to higher-ups in June. When he didn’t get a response for another month, Pollum followed up a month later, sending police a link to a crime solved in Tampa, Florida, through Ring’s cameras. CVPD didn’t respond to that message.At the same time, the department was coordinating National Night Out, an annual police-community event for promoting neighborhood safety. Ring was a sponsor for it, and its coordinator promoted contests and giveaways for free video doorbells and discounts at CVPD’s event.”We appreciate the goodies you’re sending and are most interested in having someone man a booth,” Angela Gaines, CVPD’s police community relations officer, told Ring in an email.Ring had brought 20 video doorbell kits for the police community event that August.PressuringThe peer pressure campaign started in January 2019, after surrounding police departments partnered with Ring. Pollum had given the department another demo, and sent the CVPD the memorandum of understanding again on Feb. 1. Giaime told Ring that the department was “eager” to sign the contract but needed to send it off to the chain of command for approval. He told Pollum it would take a few weeks to get a formal presentation together. Four days after Ring’s demonstration, Pollum followed up with another email. “We executed the La Mesa PD MOU yesterday, so they will join Carlsbad PD and Oceanside PD as San Diego LE portal participants,” Pollum wrote. “Not sure if peer pressure is a good thing or not, but wanted to at least make you aware that they are joining the program and will be onboarded shortly.”About three weeks later, on Feb. 21, Pollum followed up and told the sergeant that the La Mesa police department joined Ring, and the San Diego sheriff’s department approved the MOU. Again, Giaime told Pollum he would need a few weeks to put together the presentation and get approval from the command staff.  Ring followed up in a month and a half, listing even more police departments that are signing up with the company. “As Chula Vista Police Department considers the benefits of gaining access to the Neighbors Portal, I thought it might be helpful to know of other agencies in the area that have joined,” Pollum wrote on April 2. He listed the San Diego County sheriff’s department, along with police in Oceanside, Carlsbad and La Mesa, and noted that officers in Escondido and National City were considering the program. Six days after that, Ring sent another email to CVPD with the same message. “SD Sheriff’s joined a couple of weeks ago so I’m hoping to get the other major cities in San Diego onboard quickly. Can you give me a quick update on where things stand?” Pollum wrote. Giaime responded with an apology, noting that the police “had a lot of things going on” during that time.  He made the presentation to higher-ups on April 26, and four days later, the Chula Vista Police Department signed Ring’s contract, which went into effect on May 1. The department officially announced it joined three months later, on its Instagram page.After a year of emails, discounts and peer pressure from Ring’s executives, CVPD became one of hundreds of police departments to join Ring.   Share your voice Ring’s smart doorbell keeps a close eye on your housecenter_img 4:14 68 Ring convinced police to join its network through peer… Tags Security Cameras Security Ring Amazonlast_img read more

Contracted Poll Finds 20 Percent Of Workers Freelance

first_imgArun Sundararajan, a management professor at New York University and author of The Sharing Economy, says “this is the work arrangement for the future.” The new normal will be freelance work. “Twenty years from now, I don’t think a typical college graduate is going to expect that full-time employment is their path to building a career,” Sundararajan says.He says that will ultimately lead to many other changes, from education to social structures and public services.A short distance from Orrick’s offices, Wheeling’s mayor, Glenn Elliott, is starting to think through the implications of that.Elliott himself once worked as a contractor at a law firm and says contract work holds both great promise and great peril for the city. On the plus side, he sees more economic opportunities, if it can attract more companies like Orrick. On the other hand, he worries how this also changes the fundamental social contract between employers and workers.“I don’t think that loyalty necessarily exists between employers and their employees that used to be there,” Elliott says.Yuki Noguchi/NPRWheeling Mayor Glenn Elliott says he worries how the rise of independent contractors is changing the fundamental social contract between employers and workers.Those looser ties will shift more responsibility to contract workers. They must handle saving for retirement and their health insurance on their own.“But some people, despite their best efforts, just aren’t going to be successful in doing that,” Elliott says. “What’s going to happen to those who fall through the cracks? Because the 1950s model of retirement and getting your pension check every year from your company is not a realistic model for a lot of people, increasingly.”The public safety net — the budgets for fire departments and social services — is already strained, he says, by the area’s opioid problems, among other things. A future where fewer workers have benefits won’t help.Elliott expresses frustration with partisan battles at the state and federal level, while cities like his struggle to figure out how to plan for the future.“It’s a much broader problem than Wheeling,” he says. But “as a country we need to be having a conversation, which we’re not really having right now.”Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Share Photo by JC SUllivanThe Orrick law firm’s modern operations, using artificial intelligence and contract lawyers, are located in an old-metal stamping factory in Wheeling, W.Va.A new NPR/Marist poll finds that 1 in 5 jobs in America is made up of workers under contract. Within a decade, contractors and freelancers could make up half of the American workforce. Workers across all industries and at all professional levels will be touched by the movement toward independent work — one without the constraints, or benefits, of full-time employment. Policymakers are just starting to talk about the implications.In a weeklong series, NPR will explore many aspects of this change.In an old metal-stamping factory that was once part of Wheeling, W.Va.’s industrial past, a law firm has set up a futuristic model for how to get legal work done. Unlike the old factory, it relies heavily on new kinds of work arrangements.“Contractors are hired by the hour,” says Daryl Shetterly, director of the Orrick firm’s analytics division. “So we might have 30 people working today, and tomorrow we might have 80.”Tenure for workers in the building used to be measured in decades. Now it might last a few days for the workers there today. While the building has had a facelift, Shetterly says, “it is a factory in that we work to drive efficiency and discipline into every mouse click.”The division is a kind of processing center, using artificial intelligence tools and cheaper lawyers to speed up the handling of routine tasks, such as sorting and tagging documents. That frees other lawyers to focus on more high-end work.It’s emblematic of the kind of contract work expanding into every corner of the economy. Machines are siphoning off basic tasks, and temporary workers allow flexibility to size up and down. In the legal field, there are online platforms that match freelance lawyers with clients. It’s like dating profiles — but with customer reviews and billing assistance.The legal job market, in other words, is fragmenting, and with it, its workforce.“Lots of people go into law expecting that they’re headed to a secure, well-paying, intellectually satisfying, high-prestige job, and lots of those people find out that’s not what they’re headed to,” says Gillian Hadfield, who studies legal markets at the University of Southern California.She says the speed with which business evolves these days forces everyone — from businesses themselves to suppliers to the competition — to respond quickly. Employers need specialized expertise on demand, just not for the long term.It’s not just business driving the trend. Surveys show a large majority of freelancers are free agents by choice.Yuki Noguchi/NPRJohn Vensel is a contract attorney at the Orrick law firm in Wheeling, W.Va. He says contract work is today’s economic reality.John Vensel is a contract attorney at Orrick who grew up a few miles from Wheeling, on the other side of the Pennsylvania state line. In his 20s, he was a freelance paralegal by day and a gig musician by night.“I actually wanted to be a rock star,” he says. But these days there are no edgy vestiges of a former rocker, only a 47-year-old family man cooing over cellphone photos of his children, Grace and Gabe.In the two decades in between, Vensel worked full-time corporate jobs. But he was laid off in 2010, on the eve of his graduation from his night-school law program. He graduated with huge piles of debt, into one of the worst job markets.“It was terrible; it was like a nuclear bomb went off,” he says. “My son had just been born. … We’ve been kind of recovering ever since.”For a time, Vensel commuted three hours round-trip to a full-time job in Pittsburgh. But more recently, he quit and took up contracting to stay near home in Wheeling.“So, like my father, he’s in the hospital right now which is like five minutes away, and I’m getting updates on my phone,” he explains, glancing at the device. “And if I need to be there, I can be there in five minutes.”He says contract work is today’s economic reality. Contracting allows employers to test workers out, he says, but he ultimately is hoping to land a full-time position, with benefits. A new NPR/Marist poll shows that 34 percent of part-time workers are looking for full-time work.That may be increasingly difficult. Currently, 1 in 5 workers is a contract worker, the poll shows. Within a decade, many labor economists believe freelancers will outnumber full timers.Vensel draws a contrast with his father, who retired after working 35 years at the Postal Service.“He has a pension; we don’t have pensions anymore,” Vensel says. “It’s a totally different world.”Sixty-five percent of part-time workers and a little more than half of contract workers work without benefits, according to the NPR/Marist poll.last_img read more

Feds No More Education Legal Services For Immigrant Kids

first_imgWilfredo Lee/AP/FileIn this April 19, 2019 file photo, migrant children play soccer at the Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children on Good Friday in Homestead, Fla. The government has stopped reimbursing some contracted shelters for the cost of teaching immigrant children English-language courses and providing legal services and recreational activities. The Health and Human Services department notified shelters around the country recently that it was not going to reimburse them for teachers’ pay or other costs.The federal government has stopped paying for English-language courses and legal services at facilities that hold immigrant children around the country, imposing budget cuts it says are necessary at a time when record numbers of unaccompanied children are arriving at the border.The Health and Human Services department notified shelters around the country last week that it was not going to reimburse them for teachers’ pay or other costs such as legal services or recreational equipment. The move appears to violate a legal settlement known as the Flores agreement that requires the government to provide education and recreational activities to immigrant children in its care.But the agency says it doesn’t have the funding to provide those services as it deals with a soaring number of children coming to the U.S., largely from Central America.It’s now up to the various nonprofit and private organizations run facilities for the children to cover the cost of teachers, supplies, legal services and even recreational activities and equipment — if they can, or choose to.BCFS, a nonprofit provider in several Texas cities, said in a statement that it would continue providing services because not doing so would violate state licensing standards. It said it will use emergency funding from its parent organization. “The health and well-being of those in our care are of the utmost importance and we hope there is a rapid resolution to this funding issue,” spokeswoman Evy Ramos said.The government says it currently has 13,200 children in its care, and more are coming. The Border Patrol said Wednesday that 11,500 children crossed the border without a parent just last month. The kids are transferred to the care of Health and Human Services after the Border Patrol processes them. Health and Human Services contracts out their care and housing to nonprofits and private companies.“As we have said, we have a humanitarian crisis at the border brought on by a broken immigration system that is putting tremendous strain (on the agency),” spokeswoman Evelyn Stauffer said. “Additional resources are urgently required to meet the humanitarian needs created by this influx – to both sustain critical child welfare and release operations and increase capacity.”Health and Human Services is seeking nearly $3 million in emergency funding to cover more beds and provide basic care.An official at one of the shelter providers said the government notified them on May 30 that they wouldn’t be reimbursing costs of providing education and other activities. The providers pay for things like teacher salary upfront and are then reimbursed by the government.The official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak on the matter, said his employer was scrambling to figure out how it would cover the cost of teachers. The provider hasn’t laid anyone off, but worries about children who desperately need to learn English and be intellectually stimulated.Advocates are also worried about the ramifications of cutting recreational activities. Funding cuts may result in physical education coordinators from being let go and in a lack of adults who can supervise children playing outside.“The kids are inside 23 hours, and the hour they spend outside is a real lifeline for them,” said J.J. Mulligan, an attorney at the Immigration Law Clinic at University of California, Davis, who has visited and spoken to many of the children at the facilities. “Most of them come from Latin American countries where soccer is king, so the ability to play with their friends really brings them joy in dark circumstances.”In a memo to staff obtained by The Associated Press, Southwest Key interim CEO Joella Brooks said she was working with the government to figure out why the funding had ended and how it can continue to offer the services. Southwest Key is a nonprofit and the largest provider of shelters for immigrant children.“In the meantime, remember the service, encouragement and compassion you provide to these youth every day matters a great deal. Please continue to stay focused on taking good care of them,” Brooks wrote to her staff.U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Arizona, was critical of the cuts.“By eliminating English classes and legal aid that are critical to ensuring children successfully navigate the asylum process, the Trump Administration is essentially condemning children to prison and throwing away the key until their imminent deportation,” Grijalva, who represents a district on the border, said in a statement.___Gomez Licon reported from Miami. Associated Press journalist John Mone contributed to this report. Sharelast_img read more

Senior bureaucrats from ministry likely to be summoned by police

first_imgThe Special Investigation Team (SIT) is keeping a vigil on former employees and a few senior bureaucrats from various ministries in connection to the corporate espionage case, after the recent arrest of the two former multi-tasking staffs (MTS) by the Crime Branch.“Very soon, the SIT will summon several senior bureaucrats from the ministry for investigation. Bureaucrats, employees and officials with the Public Sector Undertakings will also be questioned, as we have found the involvement of some of them in this case,” a source told Millennium Post. A senior police official privy to investigation said that the same module, which was involved in the stealing and leaking of documents, had their men within the ministry of environment and forests, ministry of power, ministry of telecommunications and ministry of road transport and highways. Also Read – Company director arrested for swindling Rs 345 croreThe probe has further brought to light that the stealing and procuring of the highly classified documents had been going on for a decade. The two arrested employees, who were associated with the environment ministry and the Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) said that they have been stealing the documents since 1996 and selling them to the corporate houses.It has been revealed by the accused persons that documents from the forest ministry, transport and highways had been demanded by the corporate houses. After picking a few targets, the concerned offices were besieged and the lower-rung employees were contacted to procure the documents related to that ministry, the source said. Also Read – Man who cheated 20 women on matrimonial websites arrestedThe SIT arrested Jatinder Nagpal, personal assistant to the joint secretary in the ministry on Wednesday night. He was accompanied by one Vipan Kumar, personal assistant to a member of the UPSC. Kumar had joined the petroleum and natural gas ministry in the position of a stenographer in 1996. The police said that, from 1996 to 2010, Kumar used to steal documents from the ministry with the help of his contacts and subsequently pass them on to corporate houses. Nagpal, too, had joined service as a stenographer in 1994 at the ministry of law and justice, where he served till 2007. From 2001 to 2003, while he worked at the ministry of chemicals and fertilizers, he used to acquire documents from Vipan Kumar, Lokesh Sharma (already arrested earlier) and his other contacts.last_img read more

Franchises retain 41 Indian footballers for 2015 ISL

first_imgThe Indian Super League (ISL) franchises have retained a total of 41 footballers and signed 23 more from the open market in a step towards building their respective squads for the second edition of the tournament later this year.All the eight franchises have submitted on Friday, within the stipulated deadline, the list of retained Indian players as well as open market signings, an ISL release said on Sunday.The franchises had a retention quota of minimum of one and maximum of six Indian players. Also Read – Khel Ratna for Deepa and Bajrang, Arjuna for JadejaFranchises Chennaiyin FC, FC Goa, FC Pune City and Kerala Blasters FC have exercised the maximum allowed retention clause by retaining six Indian players each from their previous squad.Delhi Dynamos and NorthEast United FC have retained five each, defending champions Atletico de Kolkata retained four players and Mumbai City FC continued the services of three.Each franchise is allowed to have a squad of 22, comprising 13 Indian and 9 international players including one marquee signing. Additionally, a franchise can sign 3 more players from the open market which can include maximum of 2 international player.Indian player signings will be completed in the month of July through an auction followed by draft of unsigned players. The 2015 ISL is scheduled to kick-off in September and stretch till December 2015.last_img read more

DM wife assault man inside police station video goes viral

first_imgDarjeeling: A District Magistrate and his wife allegedly slapped and kicked a man and even threatened to kill him even as policemen were present, for allegedly posting indecent comments against the DM’s wife on social media. In a video that has gone viral, Alipurduar DM Nikhil Nirmal and his wife are purportedly seen repeatedly slapping and kicking the man at Falakata police station.Following this, there was widespread controversy and Nirmal has been sent on compulsory leave while Chiranjib Ghosh has taken over as the acting DM of Alipurduar. Binod Kumar Sarkar, the accused, was granted bail by the Additional Chief Judicial Magistrate II, Alipurduar, on Monday. Judge Purba Kundu raised questions as to why BDO Supratik Mazumdar had lodged the FIR against the accused and not the DM or his wife. The judge further questioned the DM’s action (beating up the accused inside a police station). A video clip has gone viral on Sunday showing Nirmal and his wife beating up Sarkar mercilessly inside Falakata police station while the man is seen begging for forgiveness. In the clip, Nirmal, after slapping Sarkar, threatens him with dire consequences. “No one will speak against me in my district. If I can put you in the slammer within half-an-hour, I can go to your house and kill you too,” threatens Nirmal in the clip. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeHis wife slaps and kicks the man and then orders for a baton to beat him up. The police later escort him out. Sarkar was arrested and charged under Sections 509 (eve teasing,) 354 (molestation) of the IPC along with Section 67 of the IT Act. While being taken to the Falakata Hospital, Sarkar stated that he was Nandini Krishnan’s (Ranjan’s wife) Facebook friend. The two had a disagreement while chatting and she added him to a group. In the group, others started abusing him. He simply retaliated with the comments. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedHuman Rights organisations, the civil society and netizens vehemently rebuked what they termed as the DM’s “high-handedness.” Community Human Rights, later during the day, lodged a complaint against the DM and his wife. Alipurduar Abhibhabok Mancha wrote a written complaint to the SP asking him to initiate legal action against the DM and his wife. “If my son has done anything wrong let the law take its course. Is it right for the DM to take law in his own hands and beat him up mercilessly?” questioned the mother of the accused. She had visited Falakata police station to lodge an FIR against the DM and his wife. “We have granted the DM 10 days of compulsory leave. As of now, Chiranjeeb Ghosh, the ADM, will take charge,” stated Barun Roy, Divisional Commissioner. 33-year-old Sarkar hails from Harinathpur, Deogaon Gram Panchayat, in Falakata. He is a private tutor by profession.last_img read more

Rep Kahle encourages residents to think local during Buy Michigan Week

first_img Categories: Kahle News,News Buy Michigan Week – which runs through Aug. 5 – is a great opportunity to buy locally and support Lenawee County, state Rep. Bronna Kahle said today.“Buying products made right here in Michigan, especially Lenawee County, is a fantastic way to create jobs and support our friends and neighbors,” said Rep. Kahle, of Adrian. “Focusing on Michigan-made products from factories to farms will help families across the state.”This past October, Rep. Kahle co-sponsored a House resolution setting aside a weekend to promote “Buy Nearby” – an annual statewide effort urging shoppers to look to local retail outlets.The Buy Nearby project estimated that if Michigan residents focused on buying locally, an additional $9 billion in economic activity would follow and nearly 74,000 jobs could be created.“More money stays at home when we buy local,” Rep. Kahle said. “That also helps local communities and schools in all sorts of ways.” 01Aug Rep. Kahle encourages residents to think local during Buy Michigan Weeklast_img read more